Office 365

Office 365 (28)

 

As a best practice, you should make sure no sensitive data is accidentally left hidden in a file (or the file properties) when you are ready to share a file publicly, with clients, or even with colleagues. This is a pretty easy task in Microsoft Office 2010, thanks to the Backstage View, which allows you to manage files and perform critical tasks to protect your data and private information. 

Here’s an example of what you need to do in Word 2010. 

With a file open, select the File menu choice on the Ribbon. When the Info option on the left is selected, the workspace will display various information about the file, as shown in the following screenshot. 

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Notice in the center of the workspace the section labeled Prepare for Sharing. When you access the Backstage View, Word 2010 analyzes the document and updates this information dynamically to warn you of any potential issues with the file. These issues can include data vulnerabilities (such as stored document properties that you may not want to share), as well as other potential sharing issues (such as problems with accessibility for people with disabilities). 

Click the Check for Issues button and select Inspect Document. 

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The Document Inspector will open, allowing you to select what types of data you want to search for. Make your selections and click Inspect. 

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The results are then returned, organized by type. Each type of content has its own Remove All button. This allows you to remove all Document Properties and Personal Information, for instance, while keeping the Custom XML Data. 

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Click the Remove All button beside any types of data you want to remove and the Document Inspector will update to tell you the data has been removed successfully. Note the change in status for Document Properties and Personal Information in the following screenshot. 

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Once you’ve removed the data, be sure to Save the file so your changes all take effect. 

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Like in other versions of Word, Word 2010 can handle the paste command in a variety of ways (for instance, you can choose to paste text with formatting, merge formatting, paste text only, and so on). These options are typically provided with a dropdown menu that appears after you paste something into your document. 

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If you spend a lot of time working in Word (or one of the other Office 2010 applications), you’ve probably found that you have a tendency to use one particular paste option most often—for example, you might usually paste just plain text without any formatting. If so, you may want to change the default setting for how an application pastes so you don’t have to keep selecting the correct option. 

To configure the default paste settings in Word, go to the Home tab on the ribbon, click the arrow below the Paste button, and select Set Default Paste. 

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This opens the Advanced section of the Word Options dialog. Scrolling down a bit, you’ll find the Cut, Copy, and Paste settings. Here you can specify a number of settings for how the Paste command should be handled in different scenarios, such as doing a copy-and-paste within a single document as opposed to between two documents. 

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When you select text in Word or PowerPoint using the mouse, once you drag beyond the beginning or end of the first word, the selection starts to extend by a complete word at a time (rather than by a character at a time). For many tasks, this can be a handy feature. However, some users do not want this behavior. 

To configure Word or PowerPoint so that selections begin and end precisely where you drag instead of observing word boundaries, click File to open Backstage view, click Options, and then click Advanced. 

Under Editing options, clear When Selecting, Automatically Select Entire Word. 

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Office saves unformatted AutoCorrect entries in AutoCorrect List files, which have an .acl file name extension. (Note that the actual file name varies depending on the language you use.) To use your AutoCorrect entries on another computer (or to share them with another user profile on your computer), locate the .acl files in the %AppData%\Microsoft\Office folder. (You can type the path in Windows Explorer exactly as shown here and the %AppData% environment variable will automatically expand to the full path. In Windows 7, that path is C:\Users\username\AppData\Roaming\Microsoft\Office by default, but it might be different on your computer.) 

Copy the two .acl files to the comparable folder on another computer or in another user’s profile. 

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Formatted AutoCorrect entries in Word are stored in the Normal.dotm template file, which is stored by default in %AppData%\Microsoft\Templates. You can copy this file to another computer or profile, but note that the template includes styles, macros, and other items. You cannot extract and copy only the AutoCorrect entries. And if you copy and paste the entire file, you will replace the styles and other items in the template file that you overwrite. 

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Document libraries support version control at several levels. By default, versioning is not enabled, but is enabled in the document library settings. 

Versions are complete copies of the document, not deltas. 

To enable versioning, perform the following steps: 
1. Navigate to the document library by clicking on its title. 
2. In the document library, select Library Tools, Library on the management Ribbon for the document library. 
3. Select Library Settings in the Settings section. 
4. Under General Settings, select Versioning Settings. 
5. Select the versioning options required, under Document Version History. 

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Note that you should ensure any versioning strategy you implement should meet any document management and retention policies enforced by your company. 

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Searching in Word is not limited to letters, numbers, and other symbols. You might need to search for line-ending codes—for instance, to eliminate repeated line breaks or to find an occurrence of text that is at the end of a paragraph. 

Here are 20 character strings you can enter in the search box to find special characters and other items. 

Search String Searches For
^l (lowercase L) Manual line break
^p Paragraph break
^n Column break
^m Manual page break
^b Section break
^t Tab character
^w White space (space or tab)
^s Nonbreaking space
^~ Nonbreaking hyphen
^- Optional hyphen
^= En dash (–)
^+ Em dash (—)
^^ Caret (^)
^% Section symbol (§)
^v Paragraph symbol (¶)
^? Any character
^$ Any letter
^# Any digit
^e Endnote mark
^g Graphic



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Sometime you need filler text when you’re working on the layout of a document. It may be for all the text or just for certain spot elements, such as captions. 

Word offers an easy way to quickly insert text into a document. You can opt for the classic lorem ipsum in Latin, the popular “quick brown fox” text, or a passage from the Word documentation. 

If you want to insert a block of lorem ipsum text, simply type =lorem(X,Y) at the beginning of a new paragraph and hit enter. The X value here lets you specify the number of paragraphs you want to insert and the Y value lets you specify the number of sentences in each paragraph. So, for instance, =lorem(4,3) will insert 4 paragraphs with 3 sentences each. 

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For the quick brown fox filler text, type =rand.old(X,Y) at the beginning of a new paragraph and hit enter. And for text taken from the Word documentation, type =rand(X,Y) at the beginning of a new paragraph and hit enter. (Note that this command will not insert text if the command is not placed at the beginning of a paragraph—for instance, it can’t follow text in-line. But, as you’ll see in the screenshot, you can use this command in table cells.)

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Printing a multipage document in booklet form is a difficult task if you do it manually. You need to calculate page sizes and margins, and worst of all, you have to reorder the pages so that they come out in the proper order when the sheets are folded and collated. Fortu¬nately, Word can do all the hard work for you. 

To set up a document to print as a booklet, follow these steps: 
1. On the Page Layout tab, click Margins, Custom Margins. 
2. On the Margins tab of the Page Layout dialog box, next to Multiple Pages, select Book Fold. 
3. Under Margins, enter dimensions for page margins. Keep in mind that the page size is now one-half of the paper size. (For example, if you’re using letter size paper, the new effective page size is 5½ inches by 8½ inches.) 
4. If you want to allow additional space along the fold to accommodate a binding, increase the Gutter value. 
5. Next to Sheets Per Booklet (under Pages), select the number of pages you want in each booklet. If your document has more pages than the number you select, the document prints as multiple separate booklets. 

After you create the document content and you’re ready to print your booklet, choose File, Print. Click the second button under Settings, and then select either Print On Both Sides (if your printer can duplex automatically) or Manually Print On Both Sides (if your printer prints on only one side of the sheet). 

Note that for the best results, you should follow these steps before you enter and format the document content. 

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If you routinely send e-mail to the same group of people (or schedule meetings with a committee or club), you can avoid the tedium of picking each name individually and create a Contact Group item that includes those names. 

Open the folder that contains the contacts you want to save as a group. Click New Contact Group on the Home tab. 

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Give the Contact Group a name and then click Add Members to begin picking from your Contacts folder or another address book. 

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The resulting group will appear among the rest of your contacts. 

If you want to change a group’s name, add or remove members, or add notes about the group, simply double-click the group and then you can manage it. 

Send Mail to a Contact Group:
To address a message or meeting invitation to a Contact Group, enter the group name in the To: field or BCC: field. When you click send, the group name will be replaced by all the addresses included in the group. 

This brings up an important point. A Contact Group is not the same as a mailing list (or discussion list) managed by an e-mail server. With a mailing list, you use a group name (like This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.) to send and receive e-mail messages, and the messages are passed on individually to list members who see only the group alias in the To: or From: field. But when you use a Contact Group to create a new e-mail message, the group name is replaced with the individual addresses in the group. If the Contact Group contains 37 e-mail addresses and is placed in the To: field, every recipient will see every one of those 37 addresses. If you don’t want your recipients to be identified, you need to place the Contact Group name in the BCC field.

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You cannot switch to a different profile within Outlook. However, if you maintain two or more Outlook profiles that you use regularly, you can configure Outlook so you have the opportunity to select which profile you want to access when you start Outlook. 

Make sure Outlook is closed, and open Mail in Control Panel. 

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Select Show Profiles. For the “When Starting Microsoft Outlook, Use This Profile” setting, select Prompt For A Profile To Be Used. 

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Click OK, and then restart Outlook to open the Choose Profile dialog box where you can select from the Profile Name list or even create a new profile on the fly. 

If you want to set the selected profile as the default, click Set As Default Profile at the bottom of the dialog box before clicking OK. If this check box is hidden, just click the Options button at the right to reveal the Options section. 

Do You Need Multiple Profiles?
Note that with Outlook 2010, you can now include multiple e-mail accounts from an Exchange server in a single profile. It used to be that you had to create a new profile for each Exchange account. 

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